The View East

Central and Eastern Europe, Past and Present.

Gdansk

 

From 7 – 10 November I visited Gdansk, at the kind invitation of the European Solidarity Centre. I was participating in a conference, ‘Europe with a View to the Future‘, which was organised by the ESC in collaboration with the journals New Eastern Europe and Nowa Europa Wschodnia (both of which I’ve previously contributed articles to), the Jan Nowak-Jezioranski College of Eastern Europe and the Heinrich Böll Foundation. Unfortunately I arrived too late to attend the welcome reception on 7 November, which included the launch of Professor Jeffrey Goldfarb’s new book ‘Reinventing Political Culture‘, however I was up bright and early the following morning to join my fellow conference delegates! The second day of the conference opened with a short talk and a film showing about the European Solidarity Centre, which was founded in 2007 with a focus on preserving the heritage of the Solidarity movement and promoting its relevance for future generations. Rather fittingly, this session took place in the historic BHP Hall at the Gdansk shipyards – in the same room where, following the strike action of August 1980, the Gdansk Agreements (which led to the establishment of the independent trade union Solidarity) were signed, and since August 2010 the site of an exhibition about the Solidarity movement. From 2014 however, the ESC will be based at a new site nearby and so conference delegates were treated to a tour of the new building, which is still very much under construction – this was the first conference I’ve attended where I’ve been asked to don a hard hat and tour a construction site!

 

Opening conference presentation by the European Solidarity Centre, in the BHP Hall at Gdansk Shipyards. Photograph taken by me.

‘Europe with a View to the Future’ conference delegates touring the new European Solidarity Centre site – still under construction, due to open in June 2014! Photograph taken by Grzegorz Mehring, posted here with permission from the European Solidarity Centre.

 

The new Centre sounds like a fantastic project – designed to function as a cultural and educational hub (the conference organisers spoke of their desire for the new ESC to act as a ‘Gdansk agora’), the new building will house an interactive museum about the history of the Solidarity movement and the collapse of communism in Poland and across Eastern Europe, a multimedia archive and library and will organise and promote cultural and educational initiatives including exhibitions, concerts,  conferences, workshops and seminars. I’d certainly like to visit again when it opens in 2014! You can read more about it HERE.

 

We then moved to the Old Town Hall for the main conference discussion which consisted of two panels, the first on the theme of ‘Solidarity in a Contemporary Europe’, the second debating ‘Europe as Seen from the East’. The panels were delivered in a ’round table’ setting, which was a nice touch, providing another nod to the legacy of Solidarity and the famous round table talks that led to the collapse of communism in Poland in 1989.  I participated in the first session, ‘Solidarity in a Contemporary Europe’, which related to the likely future of the European Union, in light of the current Eurozone crisis, the ongoing ‘bailout’ negotiations and mounting questions about European integration. I spoke about the historical evolution of the European project and also discussed British attitudes towards the EU –  a hot topic coming at a time when all three of the major UK political parties are publicly  seeking to ‘reposition‘ their policies regarding Britain’s place in the EU, Foreign Secretary William Hague recently claimed that the British publics’ disillusionment with the EU is ‘the deepest its ever been’ and Prime Minister David Cameron has emphasised the need for  reform, renegotiation and the increasing likelihood of some kind of referendum on  Britain’s future in Europe. Other panel participants also provided interesting insights from German, Polish and US perspectives on European integration and our panel was followed by a lively question and answer session!

 

Roundtable panel discussion: ‘Solidarity in a Contemporary Europe’. Photograph taken by Grzegorz Mehring, posted here with permission from the European Solidarity Centre.

My contribution – discussing British attitudes towards the European Union. Photograph taken by Grzegorz Mehring, posted here with permission from the European Solidarity Centre.

 

The afternoon panel, ‘Europe as Viewed from the East’ was equally interesting, with panelists discussing contemporary Russian, Belarusian and Ukrainian perceptions of ‘Europe’ and debating the extent to which EU membership is still viewed as an attractive prospects by its eastern neighbours today. We ended the day with a well earned drinks reception hosted by a local art gallery, perusing a photographic exhibition documenting last years Moscow protests and listening to Tatiana Kosinova discussing her new book ‘Polish Myth’, which explores links between communist-era dissident movements in Poland and the USSR, drawing on information taken from interviews conducted with several former dissidents, before enjoying dinner in a waterfront restaurant in the old town. This was an interesting and stimulating conference, and I’d like to take the opportunity here to thank the European Solidarity Centre for their hospitality.

 

After the conference, I had a day free to see some of Gdansk before flying home. I began by heading back to the shipyard, the birthplace of the Solidarity movement, where I visited the Monument of the Fallen Shipyard Workers. Also built as part of the 1980 Gdansk Agreement, to serve as a memorial to the 42 shipyard workers killed during the protests that took place in December 1970, this was the first monument to the victims of oppression to be erected in a communist country. I passed through the famous shipyard Gate no. 2 (still displaying a replica copy of the ’21 demands’ hung on the gate by the striking workers in 1980 – the original boards are UNESCO protected – combined with the addition of a Solidarity-themed souvenir kiosk!) and revisted the BHP Hall to take a more leisurely look at the Solidarity exhibition there. I also visited the Roads to Freedom Exhibition (dedicated to the history of the Solidarity movement and the collapse of communism), housed in an underground bunker! After lunch I visited the Amber museum which is housed in a beautiful fourteenth century gothic building on Ul. Dluga, wandered through the centre of the Old Town (past Lech Walesa’s office in Zielona Brama), strolled along the waterfront and enjoyed browsing the amber stalls set up on the charming Ul. Mariacka as dusk fell, stopping only to refuel with some pierogi ruskie and a beer!

 

Gdansk old town is utterly charming, a peaceful and picturesque space which belies the cities’ turbulent recent history. Virtually destroyed during WWII, the medieval buildings were painstakingly restored and rebuilt during the 1950s and 1960s (with similar post-war urban restoration projects undertaken in other Polish cities, including the capital Warsaw). Even today, just a few steps out of Zielona Brama, the remaining ruins of the old Granaries visible just across the river on Spichlerze illustrate the level of destruction wrought here less than seventy years ago.

 

A few photos follow, for those who are interested.

 

Monument of the Fallen Shipyard Workers, with the entrance to the Gdansk shipyard (Gate no 2) in the background.

Gate no 2 – Gdansk Shipyard, home of the Solidarity movement.

Outside the Amber Museum – medieval manacles hanging as a warning to potential thieves?!

The centre of the old town.

Lech Walesa’s office, in Zielona Brama.

Browsing amber stalls on Mariacka.

Waterfront

Granary Ruins.

Pierogi Ruskie!

Gdansk old town by night.

 

 

 

November 21, 2012 - Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , ,

3 Comments »

  1. Dear Kelly, So glad you enjoyed my former home! Do you see why I stayed there 4 years instead of 1? Also, your report is perfectly timed, as I am writing an article on collective memory of Solidarity and was searching for an update on the ESC! I hope you’re well.

    Comment by Susan C. Pearce | December 15, 2012 | Reply

  2. Hi Susan! Great to hear from you. Lucky you, getting to spend 4 years in Gdansk!

    Comment by kellyhignett | December 16, 2012 | Reply

  3. […] throughout the movie. I’ve really been looking forward to seeing this, particularly as I visited Gdansk, the birthplace of Solidarity, for the first time last November (and am looking forward to […]

    Pingback by Wałęsa: Man of Hope (Film Review) « The View East | October 28, 2013 | Reply


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